Texas Conservation Allaince is a dynamic group of individuals and organizations protecting Texas’ rivers, forests, coastlines, wildlife, and other natural habitats. The Alliance harnesses the energies and experience of Texans from varied backgrounds who share a common interest in protecting our state’s natural resources. TCA has an exceptional record of accomplishment over its forty-year history.  Texas Conservation Alliance builds grassroots coalitions of conservationists, sportsmen, landowners, advocates for nature tourism and outdoor recreation, business people, timber industry leaders and elected officials to influence public policies that affect the environment and to solve natural resource problems. We invite individuals and organizations to join the Alliance and help us provide a natural legacy for future generations of Texans!

As a citizen lobbyist organization, Citizens Climate Lobby (CCL) is creating the political will for a livable world by empowering individuals to experience breakthroughs exercising their personal and political power.  

Describing New York City's first cohousing project, a New York Times article said cohousing speaks to people who want to own a home but not feel lost in an impersonal city. That's how we feel.

And we want to live sustainably, with a smaller carbon footprint. To know our neighbors, grow some of our own food and use our united buying power to support local farmers and dairies. We want to model a more resilient way of life for the DFW metroplex.

We want to live in a diverse community, with old and young, singles and couples, varied backgrounds.

We're growing a community of like-minded folks who'd like to live cooperatively in urban Dallas, close to a DART station.

Our vision is that the community is affordable, with a lease-to-own option if possible.

We're at the forming stage, which means we're drawing together a core group of people willing to commit financially.

We've located some possible properties; the investor-members will determine which property works for our shared vision.

Meet other local people who are making their lives more sustainable--whether in leaps or tiny steps. We are interested in many areas of sustainable living: organic gardening, permaculture, starting a green community, homesteading, lobbying our political leaders to create a more sustainable environment, climate change, peak 0il, and preparedness.

Most of us are urban or exurban dwellers who are trying to create a positive impact on our environment and develop varied degrees of self sufficiency. Some of us are also interested in creating/moving to a sustainable eco-community.

City of Plano's Sustainability & Environmental Services Department.

The Women's Council of the Dallas Arboretum & Botanical Garden is a Texas-based 501 (c) (3) non-profit organization. Our purpose is to support and promote the interest in and growth of the Dallas Arboretum and Botanical Garden through its financial support and membership involvement of its approximately 900 members. 

One day in 1980, Bobby Scott took a walk in the woods and discovered the past - Spring Creek Forest. The pristine bottomland forest in the floodplain of Spring Creek was a haven of towering trees and unusual wildflowers on the edge of a dynamic North Garland community. Early settlers, who cut most of the timber around streambeds a century ago, left Spring Creek untouched. Mr. Scott knew that it was unique; and when he showed it to city officials in 1982, they agreed. With the help of Dallas County and the State of Texas, Garland began its efforts to protect the relic forest. Investigators discovered a dominant over-story of Chinquapin, Bur, and Shumard oaks not known to occur together anywhere else in the world. Many of these trees, 100-300 years old, soared to heights of 100 feet on trunks four feet thick.

Scientists found that not only was the forest type unique, but so were the wildflowers. The delicate Solomon's seal, not previously known to occur in the Dallas area, flourished in the forest. A large population of trout lily grew abundantly there.

The Urban Forest Advisory Committee (UFAC) was established in 2005 by the Dallas City Council to advise the Mayor and City Council on local and regional tree related issues. 

The Committee assists the city to develop good management practices so they may conserve the city’s trees and forests. It also educates citizens on trees and organizes tree plantings.

UFAC is comprised of citizens and Dallas City officials whose goal is to restore a tree-lined Dallas.

Our goal is not just a sustainable, nutritious, abundant food supply, but also thriving ecosystems that support a diversity of life. In the next century,NRCS will not only continue to tackle familiar challenges like ensuring clean water and healthy soil, but will also rise to meet new issues, such as clean air, clean energy, climate change, and new technology.

- Chief Dave White

Originally established by Congress in 1935 as the Soil Conservation Service (SCS), NRCS has expanded to become a conservation leader for all natural resources, ensuring private lands are conserved, restored, and more resilient to environmental challenges, like climate change.

The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB) was created in 1939, by the Texas Legislature to organize the state into soil conservation districts (now known as soil and water conservation districts) where there was a need expressed by local landowners. The TSSWCB was also designed to serve as the state-level administrative agency for local soil and water conservation districts (SWCDs) once the districts were organized.

Today, there are 216 SWCDs organized across the state. Each district is an independent political subdivision of state government that is governed by five directors elected by landowners in the district. The TSSWCB provides assistance to the districts through field representatives that meet regularly with districts, through TSSWCB regional offices and through programs administered by the TSSWCB.

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