Earthx, formerly Earth Day Texas, is an annual, outdoor festival seeking to elevate environmental awareness and influence the way North Texans think, live and work. The family-friendly and free event allows leaders in the corporate, academic and non-profits worlds to unite and show North Texans how green lifestyles choices can lower their cost of living, improve their health, and help save the environment.

 

 

Texas Conservation Allaince is a dynamic group of individuals and organizations protecting Texas’ rivers, forests, coastlines, wildlife, and other natural habitats. The Alliance harnesses the energies and experience of Texans from varied backgrounds who share a common interest in protecting our state’s natural resources. TCA has an exceptional record of accomplishment over its forty-year history.  Texas Conservation Alliance builds grassroots coalitions of conservationists, sportsmen, landowners, advocates for nature tourism and outdoor recreation, business people, timber industry leaders and elected officials to influence public policies that affect the environment and to solve natural resource problems. We invite individuals and organizations to join the Alliance and help us provide a natural legacy for future generations of Texans!

As a citizen lobbyist organization, Citizens Climate Lobby (CCL) is creating the political will for a livable world by empowering individuals to experience breakthroughs exercising their personal and political power.  

Meet other local people who are making their lives more sustainable--whether in leaps or tiny steps. We are interested in many areas of sustainable living: organic gardening, permaculture, starting a green community, homesteading, lobbying our political leaders to create a more sustainable environment, climate change, peak 0il, and preparedness.

Most of us are urban or exurban dwellers who are trying to create a positive impact on our environment and develop varied degrees of self sufficiency. Some of us are also interested in creating/moving to a sustainable eco-community.

City of Plano's Sustainability & Environmental Services Department.

River Legacy Foundation, a non-profit 501(c)(3) organization, began in 1988 as a unique public/private partnership with the City of Arlington. Our mission is to preserve and enhance the parkland along the Trinity River as an extraordinary educational, recreational and natural resource.

River Legacy Parks opened as a public park in 1990 with just 376 acres. Thanks to the Foundation’s donors and partnerships, the park has grown to become a 1,300-acre oasis along the Trinity River.

The Foundation founders knew from the start that an educational facility was necessary to ensure future stewards of the parkland. Thus, in 1996,River Legacy Living Science Center opened to the public.  The nature center features interactive exhibits, aquariums, terrariums, environmental education programs, a gift shop and nature trails.

One day in 1980, Bobby Scott took a walk in the woods and discovered the past - Spring Creek Forest. The pristine bottomland forest in the floodplain of Spring Creek was a haven of towering trees and unusual wildflowers on the edge of a dynamic North Garland community. Early settlers, who cut most of the timber around streambeds a century ago, left Spring Creek untouched. Mr. Scott knew that it was unique; and when he showed it to city officials in 1982, they agreed. With the help of Dallas County and the State of Texas, Garland began its efforts to protect the relic forest. Investigators discovered a dominant over-story of Chinquapin, Bur, and Shumard oaks not known to occur together anywhere else in the world. Many of these trees, 100-300 years old, soared to heights of 100 feet on trunks four feet thick.

Scientists found that not only was the forest type unique, but so were the wildflowers. The delicate Solomon's seal, not previously known to occur in the Dallas area, flourished in the forest. A large population of trout lily grew abundantly there.

The Urban Forest Advisory Committee (UFAC) was established in 2005 by the Dallas City Council to advise the Mayor and City Council on local and regional tree related issues. 

The Committee assists the city to develop good management practices so they may conserve the city’s trees and forests. It also educates citizens on trees and organizes tree plantings.

UFAC is comprised of citizens and Dallas City officials whose goal is to restore a tree-lined Dallas.

Our goal is not just a sustainable, nutritious, abundant food supply, but also thriving ecosystems that support a diversity of life. In the next century,NRCS will not only continue to tackle familiar challenges like ensuring clean water and healthy soil, but will also rise to meet new issues, such as clean air, clean energy, climate change, and new technology.

- Chief Dave White

Originally established by Congress in 1935 as the Soil Conservation Service (SCS), NRCS has expanded to become a conservation leader for all natural resources, ensuring private lands are conserved, restored, and more resilient to environmental challenges, like climate change.

The Texas State Soil and Water Conservation Board (TSSWCB) was created in 1939, by the Texas Legislature to organize the state into soil conservation districts (now known as soil and water conservation districts) where there was a need expressed by local landowners. The TSSWCB was also designed to serve as the state-level administrative agency for local soil and water conservation districts (SWCDs) once the districts were organized.

Today, there are 216 SWCDs organized across the state. Each district is an independent political subdivision of state government that is governed by five directors elected by landowners in the district. The TSSWCB provides assistance to the districts through field representatives that meet regularly with districts, through TSSWCB regional offices and through programs administered by the TSSWCB.

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